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Your bot can give you weather predictions, recite your schedule from the top of his head and even tell you a pretty good joke. But there is something I bet it can’t do – speak different languages. Ever since Mark Zuckerberg presented Facebook chat bots during annual F8 developer event in April this year, they have been all the rage. Had he launched Facebook’s M bot worldwide, he would discover that 75% of the world wouldn’t understand it (well, he probably knew that). Language barrier is a problem we understand very well at Unbabel, that’s why we created Cyrano API. How does it work? It’s easy on the outside (just go here and say „Hi” in the language of your choosing), a little bit more complex on the inside (where both our AI and community of 40k editors get to action), but the most important thing is that in few easy step you can make your bot speak with people from around the world in their native languages.

„I know this one!” I shouted really excited in my Portuguese class the other week. We were learning different idioms and the teacher asked what we think sem pés nem cabeça. It literally means without feet or a head and is used for something that doesn’t make much sense. In Poland we would say something really similar in the same situation –  nie ma rąk ani nóg – it doesn’t have arms or legs.

Most of the Polish idioms sound less familiar to a foreign speaker. Even more – they sound really bizarre. But don’t let that stop you from using them whenever interacting with Poles. With my twenty-four years of experience in speaking Polish, I’m here to teach you some of them:

As people in the language business know, FIGS stands for French, Italian, German, Spanish, long considered “The Big 4” when it comes to translation. Traditionally, when people wanted to localize their content for new markets, they turned to these four languages first. After all, they are spoken in many countries, some of which have the largest economies in the world.

But as the world continues to globalize and the internet brings together people from all over the planet, have other languages become more valuable? Some say that the FIGS will be replaced by BRIC—Brazil, Russia, India, China, which account for 40% of the world population. Some say CJK is the next frontier—China, Japan, Korea. (They really missed the mark on the catchy acronym there, didn’t they?)

Christmas is a pretty straightforward holiday — or so you might think. But with the myriad of international communities that celebrate Jesus’ birth, there’s a bevy of seemingly strange and even frightening traditions that happen every year in late December. Thanks to translation services making the world just a bit smaller and easier to understand, every year we’re learning more and more about our cousins — and their traditions — around the world. Here are five surprising Christmas traditions! Happy Holidays!

Facebook Localization Bug
Facebook is localized into more than 70 languages, including upside down English which I tried and regretted immediately!  But, they missed something: a indomitable, untranslated string, below my username. Unlike the other UI texts, “edit profile” is not Portuguese. I know because I am Portuguese. And slightly OCD about these things. I found a localization bug on Facebook!