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Last week we had a cool experience here that I think should be shared. Editors in the house Last week we got to meet several editors at our Lisbon headquarters. We have a diverse group of editors in general. Our visitors this week spanned from a TV industry professional, a soon-to-be lawyer, and a computer engineering student. We’re working on a new feature that can make rating tasks a whole new thing — or a thing of the past — soon.We asked Lisbon-based editors to come visit and help us with a usability study to find out how we can improve our design. Editors spend way more time on the platform than any developer at Unbabel, and their feedback is much more solid and insightful than any other.We usually work with (pretty elaborate) personas to develop our UX, but every time we meet editors face to face,...

July was a month full of media coverage and that was great for us! Can't believe it? Take a look:On July 14th, Workday Inc. launched a strategic venture fund focused on data science and machine learning. Their goal is to invest in 10 to 12 seed and early-stage companies until the end of 2015. The first 4 companies that will benefit from the fund were revealed and guess what? Unbabel is one of them! We couldn't be more proud and happy with that! This received an enormous media coverage where you can get more information: NetworkWorld, Nasdaq, Silicontap, 4 Traders, Bloomberg, CNN, Reuters, Yahoo! Finance, TechCrunch, Fortune, Wall Street Select, Forbes, Ask.com, San Francisco Business News and StreetInsider. Sofia Pessanha, our CMO, gave a testimonial for Global Innovation Forum in which she announced future perspectives for Unbabel. Are you curious? Read the full report...

Daniele is an Unbabel veteran. He’s been one of our best editors since our official launch in March 2014. His enthusiasm for translating and the Unbabel platform is infectious — he regularly inspires our team with his dedication to and excitement about his projects.Born and raised in Rome, he’s lived in the gorgeous town of Tübingen in southern Germany since 2010, after studying philosophy at university in Freiburg and then solidifying his German at the Goethe Institute in Rome, earning his C1 proficiency. As he says, he “worked like a nerd on my German language.” It seems to have paid off!He usually translates between Italian and German, but he’s fluent in English and knows some Spanish and French so he’ll occasionally translate those languages as well.In addition to being a trusted Unbabel editor, he is translating two books, has translation customers of his own and...

If you’ve taken the time to translate your website to reach customers in other countries, you’re likely aware that there’s no “one-and-done” when it comes to translation.Not only is it crucial to make sure your content is localized, it’s also important to have it localized to specific regions (especially important in languages like Spanish where slang and a lot of the language changes depending on the region you're in).Common Sense Advisory found in their study “Can’t Read, Won’t Buy” that an astounding 75% of non-native English speakers are more likely to buy something if post-sales support is in their own language.And interestingly enough, this holds up regardless of a person’s proficiency in English. People who speak no English are 77% more likely to make a purchase, while even confident English speakers are still 64% more inclined.Websites, user reviews and post-sales support were the most important...

At Unbabel, we’re lucky enough to have some seriously awesome customers who truly understand what it means to be an international business and to reach people in their native language. We also have a lot of customers who are just beginning their journey of internationalizing and localizing content, and we’re excited to help them navigate the road ahead. We’re always thinking of ways to help these “newbies,” and what better way than introducing them to how our kick-ass clients are dominating the international markets? Enter Musement.Musement is a travel startup operating out of Milan, focusing on providing a one-stop place for travelers to book experiences — things like exclusive, skip-the-line museum passes, cool bike or walking tours (in London, there’s a Jack the Ripper tour; in Berlin, there’s an underground music tour), wine tastings, and pretty much any tourist activity you’d want to do when...

So, you want to expand into China? Awesome! China has a huge market and the economy is growing at a crazy rate, making it a prime place to do business. China became the biggest e-commerce market in the world in 2013 when total sales passed $307 billion, and according to projections by the research firm Forrester, will grow at a compound rate of 19.9% each year, reaching $1 trillion by 2019 (that’s only four years away, by the way!). On Single’s Day 2014 (similar to the U.S.’s Black Friday), Chinese consumers spent $9.3 billion dollars. In one day.The increase in spending is largely due to increased mobile sales, a streamlined payments experience (more on that later), and companies expanding to different regions and demographics within China. Forbes found that 20% of the population are weekly mobile shoppers and 80% of online shoppers made at least...

We recently published a post called “There’s No Such Thing As Just Translate This,” and thought we'd expand on one of the things we touched on: translating user reviews. User reviews are an essential part of selling anything on the web. According to recent research, 61% of consumers read reviews before making a purchase, and visitors who interact with reviews are 105% more likely to buy something. In fact, user reviews on average produce an 18% bump in sales.There are a few reasons why they are so effective.Trust Think of the last time you bought something on Amazon — did you read a review? You probably did. When making a purchase online, there’s always a bit of risk involved, especially from a lesser-known website. And of course, the descriptions you provide can only go so far in establishing trust. In the “real world,” personal recommendations reign king,...

Summer is coming and good news are out there!"What makes Y Combinator so good?" Check what our CEO and CMO answered to this question on Techworld. Lisbon was considered one of the 5 most "Exciting Startup Cities in Europe to Get Funding". We are so lucky for being here! Know more on SmallBizClub. Investors, entrepreneurs and speakers got together in Lisbon on 4th and 5th for the Lisbon Investment Summit - the main seed & early stage startup investment event in Portugal. Big names as Dropbox, Spotify, NASA, Airbus and Facebook were present there. Vasco Pedro was one of the guest speakers. More info about the event was published on Tudo Mudou, IE Business School and Saldo Positivo. Watch our CEO's interview on 33Voices. During this interesting conversation, Vasco Pedro presents Unbabel's translation service, the experience with Y Combinator in US, the emotional debt subject and the Portuguese startup...

We often get asked about examples of companies that are succeeding internationally. Of course, there are the obvious ones, like Uber and Facebook. But one that might be less obvious is SurveyMonkey. SurveyMonkey offers super easy ways to create online surveys, and since they started up in 1999, have expanded to support 17 languages and 28 currencies.What makes SurveyMonkey so successful internationally is their deep commitment to the cause at every level of the organization. First Round Review recently talked with their CTO, Selina Tobaccowala, about how they cracked the international market. When she came aboard 5 years ago, 85% of SurveyMonkey’s business was in English. Now, they are in 17 languages, with just 55% US users and a goal of 25%.Tobaccowala says, “The biggest piece of advice I can offer is that if you start thinking about this upfront, the investment you'll have to...

As national and cultural borders dissolve due to technology and our increasingly globalized world, the need for translation jobs is growing exponentially. Businesses want to be international and multilingual, as they should. There are around half a million professional translators out there right now doing this work. And they’re doing great work.But of course, manual work isn’t scalable in any way. So long as translation remains human-based, it simply cannot keep up with demand. We’re obviously not at the place where we can eliminate human translation. I mean, have you tried using Google Translate lately? It can produce pretty hilarious results. It’s unusable for any company that wants to sound professional.After all, translation is just another form of communication, and communication is built on human-ness (this may or may not be a real word). If we strip out that human touch, we can’t be sure...